Quality Window & Door Blog

Are Casement Windows Energy Efficient?

Are you considering replacing your windows? It could be time for a window upgrade if your home is drafty and uncomfortable, and your energy costs are rising as a result. Choosing energy-efficient windows is an investment that’s sure to pay you back by lowering your utility bills. But which replacement windows deliver the highest return on investment? As it turns out, casement windows could be your best bet.

What Are Casement Windows?

Casements are different from traditional double-hung and slider windows, which open by sliding vertically or horizontally. Instead, casement windows pivot outward with hinges located on one side. To open the window, you turn a small crank built into the windowsill. This makes casements ideal for hard-to-reach places, such as behind the kitchen sink.

What Makes Casement Windows Energy Efficient?

Unlike other windows, casements close by pressing the sash against the frame, effectively reducing air leaks to virtually zero. This means, aside from picture windows that don’t open at all, casements are the most efficient window operating style available today.

Other Qualities to Look for in Energy-Efficient Windows

Many factors affect a window’s efficiency besides the way it operates. As you look for the perfect casement windows for home efficiency, make sure they have these qualities:

  • Double or triple glazing: Glass is a very poor insulator. That’s why single-pane windows are notorious for wasting energy. Insulation increases greatly with double glazing (two panes of glass) or triple glazing (three panes of glass). The trick is to leave a small air space between each pane.
  • Gas infill: To maximize the insulating power of double- or triple-glazed window, some manufacturers fill the air space between each pane with an inert, non-toxic gas. Argon and krypton are popular options because they’re denser than air, meaning they more effectively slow heat transfer through the window.
  • Warm edge spacers: All double- and triple-glazed windows require spacers to keep the panes a set distance apart. This is vital for maintaining an airtight seal and preventing the gas infill from leaking. Warm edge spacers around the window’s perimeter are the most energy efficient option because of their low conductivity and heat transfer rate.
  • Low-emissivity coating: More commonly known as Low-e glass, this special coating is comprised of a microscopically thin layer of metal. Your view out the window remains unobstructed, but the coating reflects heat back to its source. This means, in the winter, a Low-e coating reflects interior heat back inside. Then, in the summer, heat from the sun reflects back outside. As an added bonus, the coating also reflects UV rays to help protect your furnishings from fading in the sun.
  • Efficient frame material: Heat doesn’t just pass through the window pane – the frame material also impacts efficiency. Manufacturers offer a wide selection today, the most popular of which include vinyl, fiberglass, wood, wood-clad, and aluminum. As long as they’re constructed with efficiency in mind, all window frame materials have the potential to earn the Energy Star label.

Upgrade to Energy Efficient Casement Windows in MD, DC & VA

When your top priorities include beauty, functionality, and of course, energy efficiency, you can’t go wrong with casement windows. At Quality Window & Door, we supply and install some of the highest performing casement windows available today. Our non-proprietary partnership with multiple manufacturers gives you access to the best selection available anywhere!

For help choosing energy efficient casement windows for your Maryland, DC, or Virginia home, please contact Quality Window & Door. You can also visit one of our local Maryland or Virginia showrooms to see casement windows in action.

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